Welcome to the discussion area of the Dyslexia Positive website. The idea is that anyone interested in dyslexia can join in a discussion based on themes initiated by a member of the Dyslexia Positive team. Please participate by commenting on the articles and feel free to ask any questions!
Showing posts with label visual processing. Show all posts

Posted 2nd August, 2017 by Sue Partridge

This was the first question… does anyone have anything to add?  Please leave a comment.

What is the difference between receptive vocabulary and expressive vocabulary?

Discuss this in relation to both speaking & listening and reading & writing.

by Julie Baister

In terms of definitions, Receptive language skills are the ability to understand information. This involves understanding words, sentences and the meaning of what others say or what is read.

Expressive language skills are the ability to put thoughts into words and sentences, in a way that makes sense and is grammatically accurate.

At the vocabulary level, Receptive Vocabulary refers to all the words that can be understood by a person, including spoken, written, or even manually signed words.

In contrast, Expressive Vocabulary refers to the words that a person can express or produce, for example, by speaking or writing them in a grammatically acceptable manner. Continue reading this article… »

To receive an email when a new article is published, enter your email address:

NB: you should receive an email asking you to confirm whether you want to subscribe.


Posted 13th June, 2013 by Sue Partridge

Stein, J. and Kapoula, Z. (2012) Visual Aspects of Dyslexia, Oxford, OUP.

This book, published last autumn is a hard but very rewarding read.  I remember struggling to understand the magnocellular theory of dyslexia, as presented in the work of Professor John Stein, when doing my diploma qualification and later endeavouring to put the information across when teaching on the same diploma programme.

The book illustrates well how the theory behind visual facets of dysexia has developed, been debated furiously, drawn antagonists as well as advocates, widened in its applicability and still draws passionate and well-reasoned responses from its supporters.

John Stein and his co-editor Zoi Kapoula (based in Paris) have brought together a range of neuroscientists and researchers with a specialism in ophthalmology, each writing a chapter, which stands alone but together forms a story of the ramifications of this subject.  Stein provides a summary chapter of his own, bringing us up to date on his current stance.

Some highlights for me are as follows: Continue reading this article… »


Photograph of Melanie Knight

Posted 1st May, 2011 by Melanie Knight

Mind’s Eye Spelling

Mind’s Eye spelling is a visual spelling strategy.  I first used Mind’s Eye Spelling with a mature dyslexic learner with auditory processing difficulties. For years he had tried to spell words, unsuccessfully, by sounding them out. Using Mind’s Eye Spelling he was able to learn how to spell specific words and more importantly could remember how to spell the words.

Step 1

Write the word the learner wants to spell.

dyslexia

Step 2

Ask the learner to split the word into chunks. Do not worry about syllables.

dyslexia                                   dy   sle  xia

Step 3

With the learner looking at the word, get the learner to say the whole word and then say the letters in each chunk. Ask the learner to do this several times, getting them to say the chunks in different orders, for example:

  • say the letters in the last chunk (x,i,a)
  • say the letters in the first chunk (d,y)
  • say the letters in the middle chunk (s,l,e)

Step 4

With the learner still looking at the word ask the learner questions about the letters in the different chunks, for example:

  • What is the first letter of the middle chunk?
  • What is the last letter of the first chunk?
  • What letter comes after x?

Step 5

Ask the learner if they can see the word in their head. If they can’t, continue with steps 3 and 4 until they can. When they can, ask them to close their eyes and visualise the word. Ask them to say the letters in the different chunks and ask them the same type of questions in step 4.

Step 6

With their eyes still closed ask the learner to spell the word out loud. If they get it correct, ask them to spell the word backwards. When the learner can do this ask them to open their eyes and write the word down.

Useful Tips

  • It is important to allow the learner time to absorb each chunk.
  • Provide prompts where necessary.
  • Do not try and get the learner to learn too many words at once. For some learners one word per week may be enough.
2 Comments so far: leave a comment or ask a question »