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Showing posts with label listening comprehension. Show all posts

Posted 16th January, 2017 by Sue Partridge

Back in 2011, at a meeting of Dyslexia Positive we discussed the pros and cons of assessing readers when they read silently and when they read aloud.  Clearly these are two different processes.  The former may be the preferred mode of reading for competent readers, but not always for readers with dyslexia who may like an auditory feedback loop.  Reading aloud requires an additional skill in articulation on top of the regular reading skill.

The assessment issue comes when you want to measure reading speed and reading comprehension. Reading silently will almost certainly (though not invariably) be faster than reading aloud.  Reading comprehension depends on so much else, but the extra burden on working memory when articulating words to read aloud may skew the score.

Those of us who use the WRAT 4 sentence comprehension sub-test (with all of its flaws) to get a standardised score for reading comprehension will have observed some candidates reading silently and others aloud, with some readers using a mixed strategy. What bearing does this have on the score and its validity?

In an ideal world we would want to assess the reader with equivalent texts both silently and aloud and make a close comparison between the findings for the two.  Even better would be throw in a third passage to test listening comprehension and try to build up a full profile of the differences in performance. Against this is the very real threat of test fatigue.

Jocelyn from Dyslexia Positive observed that some readers think they have to read silently, because they have been taught that is the best way, even though they might not want to and it might not suit them.Yvonne liked getting the people she assessed to read silently, if they can, as it tells her about their potential for effective study.  Melanie used the Adult Reading Test (ART) for assessment, trying to get a sample of reading aloud and reading silently, but is really concerned about over-testing (the ART is particularly exhaustive and exhausting!).  Clearly you can’t do miscue analysis unless you hear the learner read aloud…

All of this argues for a more extended period of assessment and observation, so as to build up an extensive profile of reading ability, without the dangers of test stress.  With reading, it may be important for each learner to develop different strategies depending whether they want to speed read silently, read and recite (to their children or to hear a particular effect, say when appreciating poetry) or any other purpose.

This debate on assessment practice for reading is still relevant, although in 2017 there is more pressure to cram even more assessment tests into a diagnosis, and to explore co-occurring conditions as well as dyslexia. Something has to give!

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