Welcome to the discussion area of the Dyslexia Positive website. The idea is that anyone interested in dyslexia can join in a discussion based on themes initiated by a member of the Dyslexia Positive team. Please participate by commenting on the articles and feel free to ask any questions!

Posted 18th December, 2012 by Alison Earey

Recently I was asked what a parent of a primary age child should look for in a specialist dyslexia tutor, specifically whether the specialist should have any training. This was my answer and I wondered what other people think:

This a thorny issue. I have a teaching qualification and then a postgraduate specialist teaching qualification for dyslexia on top of that. However, I know that some people have supported for years and don’t have those. I think the thing that I would want to know at your child’s age is, what strategies will they use (Do they look at the child and adapt strategies and teaching methods to suit her?). How they teach phonics, whether it supports the school curriculum.
When she goes to secondary school, I would start to look at their expertise in study skills and that they are up to date with JCQ requirements for exam concessions and ICT (Do they know about software to support? What do they use to teach?). You need someone who can help your child to get the most out of what is available.
I wonder if you have any thoughts to add?
  • Maz

    I personally would look at the “Experience” the tutor has had with SPLD not particularly formal qualifications.  A tutor who’s had a child of their own, and lived with the 24/7 of having a child with Dyslexia will have a different understanding of the full effects on the child.  Most people saw my daughter as a confident, very happy child, however, after starting school and finding it so difficult she would turn into a bit of a monster on returning home!!! Venting her frustration by throwing lunch boxes across the room, being physically exhausted etc, characteristics only WE witnessed.  A tutor who understands how the dyslexia ‘may’ effect the whole life of the child to me is important

To receive an email when a new article is published, enter your email address:

NB: you should receive an email asking you to confirm whether you want to subscribe.